Trolls threaten to go out of business after paying $ 150,000 to wedding planner after mean Facebook comments


Two trolls who were sentenced to pay $ 150,000 to a wedding planner after insulting her business online are now in danger of going out of business.

Tristan Moy, 33, from Brisbane, moved to Indonesia in 2014 to run a business that organized weddings in Bali for Australian tourists.

But she suffered ‘hurt and humiliated’ when two Australian women began posting lustful comments about her and the company on Facebook in 2017 and 2018.

Those women were makeup artist Stacey Lee Isaac, 33, from Notting Hill, Victoria, and single mother of two, Kellie Maree Smith, 32, from Mount Tambourine, Queensland.

The couple were ordered to pay the massive amount earlier this month following a defamation trial in which a magistrate promised to defame Ms. Moy.

Wedding planner Tristan Moy, 33, (pictured) has won a lawsuit against keyboard warriors who made defamatory comments about her company on social media between 2017 and 2018

Ms. Isaac was ordered to pay $ 100,000 for her four posts, while Mrs. Smith was ordered to pay $ 50,000 after sharing seven defamation posts.

But the couple didn’t have to stare into life-threatening bankruptcies – they could have settled out of court for just $ 2,500 each.

Ms. Moy offered both women to settle the case for next to nothing, but the couple chose to defend their posts in court, the Courier mail reported.

On another occasion, the women were offered to pay $ 7,500 and $ 1,250 to settle, but they again declined.

Magistrate John Smith then ordered Mrs. Isaac and Mrs. Smith to pay the wedding planner’s legal fees.

Ms. Smith told the publication that she offered Ms. Moy $ 2,000 and a public apology, but Ms. Moy suggested what to write.

Stacey Lee Isaac (pictured) owned and operated a bridal Facebook page with 1,000+ followers where the most defamatory comments were made

Single mother of two Kellie Maree Smith, 32, (pictured) from Mount Tambourine in Queensland was ordered to pay $ 50,000 plus $ 9,750 interest for defamatory comments

Ms. Isaac also said she offered the wedding planner a public apology, but the couple could not agree on a settlement.

Ms. Moy sought out $ 285,000 from the two women about the reports that suggested she was unprofessional, bullied her clients, and would try to ruin their marriage.

Ms. Isaac was a makeup artist and owner of a bridal Facebook page with over 1,000 followers, where most of the defamatory comments were made.

She worked as a makeup artist in Melbourne and ran three companies’ Bali Edge ‘,’ Illuminating Moments Bali ‘and Bali Snaps Photobook’ – and shared a message criticizing Ms. Moy’s company.

“I’m sure I certainly wouldn’t hire someone to plan my wedding day who would sabotage another wedding day,” she wrote.

She also suggested that the wedding planner had evicted Ms. Isaac from Bali.

While a message from Ms. Smith directly accused Ms. Moy of ruining her own wedding by trying to cancel the venue.

That was despite the fact that Mrs. Smith had not used Mrs. Moy’s wedding planning services.

Tristan Moy, 33, from Brisbane, moved to Indonesia in 2014 to run a business that organized weddings in Bali for Australian tourists

Ms. Moy had asked for $ 285,000 from the two women about the messages suggesting that she was unprofessional, bullied her clients, and would try to ruin their weddings

Mrs. Smith said there was no way she could afford to have the $ 50,000 plus $ 9,750 interest for her share of the saga.

She said she would go out of business because of this.

While Ms. Isaac said she was “ feeling sick ” after hearing she had to pay $ 100,000 in damages for the incident.

Ms. Isaac plans to appeal the verdict after admitting that the severe punishment would lose her everything.

Ms. Moy’s attorney, Duke Myrteza of Australian Law Partners, said the case is a warning to keyboard warriors about what they are saying online.

“I expect there will be many more cases in the future involving Facebook posts in our courts,” he said.

“This case is a clear warning to anyone using Facebook or other social media platforms that anything defamatory you post online can have serious consequences.”

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